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Archive for the ‘Pictures’ Category

Saturday, November 11th, 2017 is Veteran’s Day. For the first time in my life I plan on visiting the National Cemetery ON Veteran’s Day.

During my early years of family history, I requested my 4th Great-Grandfather’s Revolutionary War record. I have since, found a picture of his grave on http://www.findagrave.com.

During my research I have been successful in finding several relatives who have served in conflicts throughout the settlement, establishment and life of this nation.

I had the privilege and honor to be able to interview my Uncle Bill Coleman

who fought in Europe in World War II.

I was just as honored to receive a letter from Uncle Stan Rush

who served in Italy during World War II.

Perhaps you also have ancestors who served. Seek out your living veterans and allow them to relate their experiences.

Come in and visit the Genealogy Center and we will assist you in seeking out your deceased veteran ancestors.

Good Hunting!

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It is now November. The beginning of end of year holidays.

November and December are loaded with various holidays that encourage family gatherings.

Perhaps you will be a part of a historic family moment.

In 1974 I had the privilege to attend my great-grandfather’s 100th birthday celebration. Will R. Coleman was born in November of 1874.

U.S. Grant was President of the United States.

I was able to ask Grandpa, “Who was the first President you voted for?” His response, “Teddy Roosevelt.”

I was amazed. When I thought about it, I realized I had asked the wrong question.

“In which Presidential Election did you first vote?”

1896.

He voted for William Jennings Bryan. Bryan did not win the election.

Grandpa had answered my first question correctly. The first PRESIDENT he voted for was Theodore Roosevelt.  His first vote was cast for a gentleman who lost the election.

Grandpa’s father Reuben Coleman was born in 1843 when John Tyler was President of the United States.

Texas was still an independent republic.

Grandpa Will’s birthday celebration included stories and memories that spanned 131 years.

Later this month our family is planning a get-together.  I hope (and our plan) is to have four generations present – my father with his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. His memories include his grandfather, Robert M. Fugate, (1863-1950).

So our reunion, with memories, could possibly span 154 years.

Photos will be taken. Family stories will be shared. Memories will be made.

As you gather with your families this year, take photographs, record the stories (video or audio or at least write them down) for your posterity.

Come visit the Genealogy Center where we can assist you with planning a family reunion, identifying questions to ask relatives/ancestors or recording oral histories.

Who knows, you may find clues to long sought-after ancestors.

Good Hunting!

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The Chillicothe Constitution Tribune (Chillicothe,Missouri) reported  – 14 Sep 1932 – on the SIXTH annual Smiley Family Reunion. The story reported 89 in attendance. On that date the reunion was in held at Lemon, Missouri.

On 15 Oct 2017 The Smiley Reunion will be held in Wheeling, Missouri, just east of Chillicothe. (It has been held in Wheeling for over 50 years now.)

This reunion is a gathering of descendants of John Andrew Smiley ( 1819-1895) and Nancy Ann Cornelius (1820-1905).

With modern technology, I have been able to connect to at least 14 relatives via DNA testing with Ancestry.com / ftdna.com / 23andme.com & myheritage.com.

However, the largest group by far, are my “Facebook Friends.”

I look forward to seeing relations I have known for some time, and meeting relatives I may only know through social media. The biggest treat will be the additional family stories I hope to hear and record.

It is the family stories, passed down from generation to generation, that draw us closer to our ancestors and each other.

John and Nancy had a family of 14 children. 12 children lived long enough to marry and have children of their own.

It will be interesting to see how many of the 12 children will be represented by their descendants.

October is Family History month.  Reach out to your relations, share stories of your ancestors and then pass these on to your family.

Have a great time

With modern technology, I have been able to connect to at least 14 relatives via DNA testing with Ancestry.com / ftdna.com / 23andme.com & myheritage.com.

However, the largest group by far, are my “Facebook Friends.”

I look forward to seeing relations I have known for some time, and meeting relatives I may only know through social media. The biggest treat will be the additional family stories I hope to hear and record.

It is the family stories, passed down from generation to generation, that draw us closer to our ancestors and each other.

John and Nancy had a family of 14 children. 12 children lived long enough to marry and have children of their own.

It will be interesting to see how many of the 12 children will be represented by their descendants.

October is Family History month.  Reach out to your relations, share stories of your ancestors and then pass these on to your family.

Good Hunting!

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There are various reasons people take DNA tests. Some are seeking medical knowledge, some are adopted children looking to reunite with the birth parents, others are seeking information on their father’s line or their mother’s line. I was looking for cousins, hoping to find information on lines where I had little or no information.

AND THAT IS WHAT HAPPENED!!

I tested with four different companies. One of the results has been to connect with a cousin also researching the ancestry of David Huggans (1815-1897 ) and Elizabeth Riley (1822-1918 ) who are both buried in Cantril, Iowa.

Reviewing the information provided by this cousin, I found suggestions on Elizabeth’s paternal line that I was able to research.  I found documented marriage, probate and burial information that allowed me to add about six or seven generations to our RILEY line.  I found Charles  Riley, son of Charles Riley and Mary Mays, grandson of John Railey (Riley) and Elizabeth Randolph)

and William Mays and Catherine Swann.  Elizabeth Randolph is the daugher of Colonel Isham Randolph and Jane Rogers (Rodgers). Elizabeth’s sister, Jane married Peter Jefferson and had a son Thomas, writer of the Declaration of Independence and 3rd President of the United States.

Elizabeth Randolph’s grandparents, William Randolph and Mary Isham, are the 2nd Great-Grandparents of General Henry “Lighthorse Harry” Lee.

They were also the 2nd Great-Grandparents of Chief Justice of the Supreme Court John Marshall.

I had NO IDEA that connecting with DNA cousins could be a link to some very historical individuals.

I am able to connect my grandson, nieces and nephews to individuals involved in the creation of this country.  I hope that knowing their connections to these individuals, will spark an interest in their school studies and hopefully, as they grow, their genealogical research.

I invite you to come into the Genealogy Center and allow us to assist you in your research.  Perhaps, you too, will find Patriot Ancestors.

Good Hunting!

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20 August 1907 – Rebekah Baines

of McKinney, Collin County, Texas weds Samuel Ealy Johnson, Jr.

Rebekah was the daughter of former state legislator Joseph Wilson Baines. Mr. Baines was one of the partners of Baines, Wolfe & Finch Lawyers and Land Agents. They created the 1881 Map of Collin County, Texas.

Mr. Baines was also the Editor & Proprietor of The McKinney Advocate at that time.

Lyndon Baines Johnson was the eldest son Samuel and Rebekah Johnson. Samuel and Rebekah would have four more children.

Rebekah Baines Johnson wrote and presented to her son, Lyndon, a book – A Family Album – for Christmas, 1854.

In 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson  presented his book to The Johnson City Foundation.

A copy of this book is located here in the Genealogy Center and is available for personal / historical research.

Come in and browse our collection at the Genealogy Center. You may find family albums, area histories or volumes containing vital records for some of your family tree.

Good Hunting!

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From the Texas State Historical Association:

“On this day in 1917, the United States War Department issued orders mobilizing the Thirty-sixth Infantry Division (known as the “Texas Division” or the “T-Patchers”) at Camp Bowie in Tarrant County.The division, initially composed mostly of Texas National Guard troops, fought in World War I and again in World War II. During the latter conflict, one unit of the division, which became known as the “lost battalion,” was captured at the fall of Java. The men of the battalion spent the war in Japanese prison camps, and many died building the Burma Railroad. When the War Department made national guard units available to the governors of the states in 1946, the Thirty-sixth Division was reactivated. The Thirty-sixth was called to active duty during the Cuban Missile Crisis, but was eliminated by January 1968. In 1946 veterans of the unit founded the Thirty-sixth Division Association.”

On a more LOCAL note – PFC Seymour Todd – Anna, Texas – served in the Texas Division in World War II. He was seriously wounded on 24 January 1944 during the “Battle of the Bloody River” in Italy. He was one of about 20 North Texans killed or wounded during this battle.  Seymour Todd survived the war, returned to Collin County and married Matilie Harper in 1945. Seymour Todd died 8 Dec 1978 in Jacksonville, Texas and is buried in Resthaven Memorial Park of the same city.

Come in and visit the Genealogy Center.  Let us assist you in finding your heroes.

Good Hunting!

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Last Thursday I was privileged to present a class on Military Records Research.

I made two specific points:

1. More and more records are becoming available all of the time. If you don’t see the the records you want online today, wait a week or two and check back.

2. Often, records are being uploaded before they are indexed and so, you may have to “Browse” the collection. Don’t be put off by the 1,000,000 plus images, as they are broken down into searchable segments.

That was Thursday. Saturday was a whole new day.

http://www.Fold3.com announced that they have added nine states to the World War II Draft Registration Cards collection. These nine states – Alabama, Alaska, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming – are no longer in the “Browse” category. They are now indexed and available to be searched without having to “Browse” through a number of images.

Periodically check the “Last Updated” column in http://www.FamilySearch.org, The “Updated” records at http://www.Ancestry.com, and the “New & Updated Collections” at Fold3.com.

This in just in time for the Memorial Day Weekend

celebration.

Often, from Memorial Day through the 4th of July, various sites offer access to military databases free of charge.

Keep an eye out and take advantage of these offers. You may find military records of previously identified ancestors, or military records of  previously unknown ancestors.

(Remember – with your Plano library card you can access several “pay sites” free of charge YEAR-Round at http://www.planolibrary.org.)

Good Hunting!

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