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Archive for the ‘Information’ Category

Have you searched www.familysearch.org recently?  If not, perhaps today is a good time to check it out.

I checked familysearch.org to see if there were any updates to areas I am researching.

To say I was surprised is an understatement. From Monday 30 April thru Thursday 2 May, I counted 91 updates.

These updates include various databases from 36 different United States, 9 different countries, plus an update to the BillionGraves Index.

During my classes here at the Genealogy Center, I encourage my attendees to check www.familysearch.org as one of their resources.

I often state, “If you don’t find the database you are looking for, check back in a week or two.”

Here at the Genealogy Center our public computers can access Ancestry Library Edition, Fold3.com, and Heritage Quest as well as other links. Some of these sites are partner sites with Familysearch.org.

You may be able to access a few of these 91 databases through the partner sites.

I encourage you to check-out www.familysearch.org from time to time. You may discover information you are seeking.

Good Hunting!

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On April 18, 1942 – Lt. Col. Doolittle led his squadron on a raid over Tokyo, Japan.

A memorial in their honor stands at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

The following Raiders were from North Texas:

1Lt. Edgar E. McElroy – Ennis, Texas
Sgt. Douglas V. Radney – Mineola, Texas
Lt. Nolan Anderson Herndon – Greenville, Texas
Lt. Kenneth E. Reddy – Bowie, Texas
Maj. John A. “Jack” Hilger – Sherman, Texas

You are invited to come in, browse our collection, and use our materials here in the Genealogy Center.

You may find information on YOUR military heroes.

Good Hunting!

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I received a notice from MyHeritage.com that I had a message.

I was contacted by a 3rd cousin to my father. I had previously uploaded his DNA results from Family Tree DNA (www.ftdna.com) to MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com).

I was informed, and then verified, that my 3G-Grandmother’s probate records were online on Ancestry library edition (www.ancestry.com). The probate file is 33 pages of information. Within these pages are the names of heirs, locations of property, and residence of heirs.

My primary reason for DNA testing – both my father and me – was to find cousins so that I might add or correct my family tree.

I have tested in Ancestry, 23andme and Myheritage. My father has tested in Family Tree DNA. I have uploaded all tests to http://www.GEDmatch.com, Family Tree DNA and My Heritage in the hope that fishing in all available ponds will allow me to catch some cousins.

With today’s message I can report that I have made a second “golden” catch.

In each case I have been able to break down a brick wall or confirm previously suspected lines.

DNA genealogy is not for everyone. For me it has produced (and continues to produce) desired results.

*** Before you purchase a DNA test from any company be sure you are comfortable with their policies and how they use or sell your DNA or personal information. ***

Good Hunting!

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The Genealogy Center has recently added a large collection of resource books from the Northwest United States.

The majority of the new material is from OREGON and WASHINGTON.  Additional volumes have also been added to our California and Colorado collections.

Birth, burial, death and marriage records (in some cases indexes) are available from various counties of these states.

These volumes will provide excellent source material for your relatives that settled or moved through the Northwest.

Our collection includes, volumes from all fifty states, the District of Columbia, over 35 foreign countries as well as military and immigration records.

Come in and peruse our collection at the Genealogy Center. You just might find that “golden nugget” of information you have been searching for.

Our staff is always available to assist you in your research.

Good Hunting!

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An ARKANSAS Family Success Story

Back in January 2018 I asked if you had ancestors who lived, died, or moved through Arkansas.

Did your spouse have ancestral lines that travel through Arkansas?

I found some answers to a few of my family questions here in our Arkansas genealogical material.

From family history records and the census records found on Ancestry.com, I determined that the Richard G. and Louisa J. Cowan family had travelled from Williamson County, Tennessee to Washington County, Arkansas about 1873.  Their son James King Cowan, born in 1861 in Tennessee, married Ollie G. Pass in Washington County, Arkansas in 1889.

Browsing through the new Arkansas material here at the Genealogy Center I found a collection of Cemeteries in Washington County, Arkansas by Byron Sistler. In volume 6, at the bottom of page 49 I found a record from the Mountain View Cemetery:

COWAN, Nellie   d of J. K.                 Aug 25, 1891   Nov 26, 1896

On http://www.findagrave.com I found a picture of the stone.

Here I had found a daughter to James K. Cowan who had married Olive G. Pass.

The 1900 Federal Census for Washington County, Arkansas shows James K. and Ollie Cowan, married in 1889. Ollie states she is the mother of THREE children with 2 children living. Their oldest child on the 1900 Federal Census is Eldridge born in November of 1894. From this information I was able to determine that Nellie was their first-born child.

Short of actually visiting cemeteries, volumes of  cemetery records are often the only way you can identify children born and died between Federal Census prior to the 1900s.

Here in the Genealogy Center we have volumes of cemetery records from various counties throughout the United States.

Come in and browse our collection.

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Here at the Genealogy Center we have increased our Royal holdings.

Was one of your ancestors one of the Twenty Five Barons of the Magna Carta, 1215?

We now have the 3 volume set of Magna Carta Ancestry available for your research.

Perhaps you may trace one of your family lines back to Geoffrey Anjou

who was known to wear a sprig of the planta genesta in his hat.

The Plantagenet royalty descend from him.

We now have the newly published Plantagenet Ancestry.

(The previous one volume has been updated and expanded to 3 volumes.)

We also have a new set for those who may descend from European Royalty.

It is possible that you descend from one of the nine children of William the Conqueror

and his wife, Matilda of Flanders.

They both trace their ancestry back to Charlemagne.

This is the 5 Volume set of Royal Ancestry.

(Some of the Kings and Queens of France, Spain, and Scotland are included.)

Our Genealogy Lineage section includes volumes on descendants of Pocahontas,

The Signers of the Declaration of Independence,

and The Signers of the Constitution.

Come in and browse our collection. You may discover royal ancestors in your family tree.

The staff here at the Genealogy Center will be happy to assist you in your family history research.

Good Hunting!

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At least it is for me.

24th of February is the anniversary of Col. Travis’s cannon shot at the Alamo in response to Gen. Santa Ana’s call for the surrender of the garrison.

It was also the anniversary of the Travis Letter.

Now to be honest I do not have an ancestor that fought at the Alamo or even at San Jacinto.

However, I repeatedly tell my grandson, Connor who was born in Texas, he has an ancestor who fought in the Texas Revolution.

His 3rd Cousin 7 times removed, William Jones Cowan, served with and fought with Col. Fannin.  He also died with his fellow soldiers on 27 March 1836 massacre.

I had no idea our family tree ran back, and found its way to the Texas Revolution. The material here at the Genealogy Center has provided all of the documentation.

I trace the family line from Missouri (my birth state) back to Pennsylvania, down to North Carolina (where W.J. Cowan was born), on to South Carolina where he boarded the ship to New Orleans.

In New Orleans he signed on as a New Orleans Grey and was assigned to Colonel Fannin’s command.

It was fascinating to see William’s signature on the roster.

I found it very emotional when Connor and I visited the Fannin memorial and saw William Jones Cowan carved in stone.

Come in and visit the Genealogy Center.

You may be able to trace your tree to a Texas Hero.

 

Good Hunting!

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