Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Information’ Category

Recently I saw a notice on http://www.familysearch.org “Searching and viewing historical records will soon require you to be logged in with a free Family Search account.” This is one of my five favorite family history research sites.

I have had a free account with them for several years. I encourage everyone who uses the site to sign-up for one. Originally, I did this so that the individual could see the actual document/record. Now there are additional reasons to create an account.

Now when I sign-in, I have several different sections to assist me in my family history research. Recommended Tasks, Recent People, Hints, To-Do List, and pictures or photos that I have recently added are all right there to select. Of course, I may go straight to the Family Tree, Search, or Memories section depending on my initial reason.

I have been able to use these sections to identify ancestors that Family Search suggests MAY be part of my tree. Using their hints/suggestions I am able to identify if they belong to my ancestral tree or not.  I can also see where I left off from my last visit.

Often I use my Family Search site to assist others. Since the Recent People list may contain names of some other family, I appreciate that I can expand the list to see what names on MY family tree I had been viewing.

If you are using http://www.familysearch.org even occasionally, and have not created a free account, I encourage you to create one today.

This site is run by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

Some folks have declined creating an account for fear they will be proselyted by representatives of the church.

I have NEVER received any email, telephone or in-person solicitation due to my having a free account. (I did receive one email inviting me to assist in Indexing the 1940 Federal Census.)

The value of actually viewing the records/documents is  well-worth creating a free account.

I invite you to visit the Genealogy Center where we can assist you in creating your free account or in researching your family history.

Good Hunting!

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Saturday, November 11th, 2017 is Veteran’s Day. For the first time in my life I plan on visiting the National Cemetery ON Veteran’s Day.

During my early years of family history, I requested my 4th Great-Grandfather’s Revolutionary War record. I have since, found a picture of his grave on http://www.findagrave.com.

During my research I have been successful in finding several relatives who have served in conflicts throughout the settlement, establishment and life of this nation.

I had the privilege and honor to be able to interview my Uncle Bill Coleman

who fought in Europe in World War II.

I was just as honored to receive a letter from Uncle Stan Rush

who served in Italy during World War II.

Perhaps you also have ancestors who served. Seek out your living veterans and allow them to relate their experiences.

Come in and visit the Genealogy Center and we will assist you in seeking out your deceased veteran ancestors.

Good Hunting!

Read Full Post »

Working in the Genealogy Center is fantastic on regular days. But, every once in a while, someone comes in and makes the day truly exceptional.

This morning a patron came in to do some work in a quiet location. As she entered she noticed the genealogy display. From her questions and her accent I could tell she was originally from Europe. As I assisted her, it became clear she was born in Uzbekistan. Her father was killed in the Second World War. Her mother was 36 years old when she was born. Within two years, her mother had a second child.

Throughout the conversation, she described her desire to trace her ancestry for her grandchildren. They are not interested in her history at this time. From time to time I would encourage her to make a record of what she was telling me, so they would have it in the future.

She described life under the U.S.S.R. She was very excited to tell me about the significance of today’s date. 7 Nov 1918, the fall of the Tsar.

Russian history taught by an American high school teacher 40 years ago, came to life, as she described events her mother experienced. She also described life during World War II and after under Soviet control.

Each of us have a personal history. We are all unique in our upbringing, our ancestry, our experiences.

Take the time to record your experiences, feelings, and memories. They are the true treasures we pass on.

It is the stories, as well as the vital statistical information, we seek when we search out our ancestry.

Come in and visit the Genealogy Center. We can assist you in seeking out your ancestry or assist you in recording your life history.

Good Hunting!

Read Full Post »

https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/vnd03

Today is the anniversary of the founding of the organization that would come to be known as The Daughters of the Republic of Texas.

Here in the Genealogy Center we have several books about members of the organization and their relatives.

Have you discovered ancestors who were residents during the time before, during or after Texas Independence?

Here in the Genealogy Center I discovered a relative killed at Goliad.  I had no idea that my family tree extended to the Texas Revolution.

Come in and allow us to assist you in your family history research. You may also discover a Texas relative.

Good Hunting!

Read Full Post »

When I was a child October meant Halloween – scary stories, costumes and parties with candy.

When I was a young / newlywed husband I found out my wife’s FAVORITE holiday was Halloween. As the children came, the holiday expanded in days (sometimes weeks) and lots of parties with candy.

However, I have found a new way to party.

Just before I retired from the Army, a young soldier asked, “What do you like to do in your free time Sarge?” My reply, “Visit old dusty archives or walk through cemeteries!” It killed any further conversation.

I love walking the cemeteries. History comes alive as I read the names and dates on the stones. The military markers tell the stories of heroes.

Without a doubt the saddest part, yet most rewarding, is to read the small stones of the children/youth that have passed on.

Sarah, dau of Thomas and Elizabeth —– born 1871 died 1877.
or
David, son of James and Katherine —– born 3 Apr 1889 died 10 Nov 1889.

I have often shed tears when I find:

Harold and Helen , twins —- Born 5 May 1855 Died 7 May 1855.
or (as I recently viewed)
Sarah, dau of J. M. & O.E. — died Oct 1878 and next to her
Olivia, wife of J.M. —- died Oct 1878.

This information is often only recorded on grave stones – the actual death/burial records having been lost or destroyed a long time ago.

I delight in seeing family plots. Three or four generations resting side by side, head to toe.

The sayings, quotes or notes on the stones often bring to life the individual, family or event.

“Little one you were too pure to stay.” or “USN, died 7 Dec 1941” or “USMC died 6 Mar 1945.”

More recently I have found – Mary, dau of —-, 1978-2002. At the foot a military plaque – killed in action – Iraq.

Almost every time I have visited a cemetery I have come away with an increased desire to find MORE about the people or families I have visited. Sometimes I have been fortunate to find a “lost relative” among the stones.

Take the time and visit a local cemetery or, as you visit relatives, make the time to visit the cemetery of your ancestors.

It is time well spent.

Good Hunting!

Read Full Post »

The 3rd Sunday in October, the Smiley Family Reunion – Wheeling, Missouri.

On Friday I left home in Texas, drove through Oklahoma and up to northern Missouri. The drive took a little over 11 hours, but the weather and picturesque views made the trip very enjoyable.

My plan was to visit cemeteries on Saturday prior to the reunion on Sunday afternoon. The forecast for Saturday was not what I had hoped – overcast, clouds and rain.

I stayed in Livingston County and planned on visiting the cemeteries in Putnam County, Missouri. (What’s another hour drive if you traveled 11 the day before.) I sought out the Putnam County Library in Unionville to verify the locations of the cemeteries I would visit. Since the library is open from 9-12 on Saturday that would give me the afternoon to walk the cemeteries.

Best Laid Plans.

By the time I reached Unionville the rain had started. However, inside the library it was dry and I found a gold mine of family information. The library has three (3) volumes on cemeteries in Putnam County. (I was able to purchase one volume.) I was elated to find all three volumes contain photographs of the headstones in each cemetery.

As I departed the library the rain was just a mist, light enough to still walk the cemeteries. I headed out. By the time I reached the first cemetery, having turned off the paved highway and traveled two (2) different dirt roads, the rain had increased to thunderstorms with lightening. I opted to forego the cemeteries and return to my motel room. The remainder of Saturday saw increased rain, thunderstorms and lightening throughout northern Missouri.

Sunday was beautiful! Light clouds and lots of sunshine.

The reunion was a gathering of 18 descendants from 3 of John A. and Nancy C. Smiley’s 13 children.

The BEST part of the gathering was the stories shared. My favorite story was about Amber Vanbuskirk. Amber was a granddaughter of John and Nancy Smiley.  She raised turkeys. In the area covered with corn, wheat, and soy beans, Amber was known for her turkeys.

My weekend was a success. I returned home with a volume of cemetery photographs and records. I have anecdotes of family members who were previously only names on a page. I also have new and renewed associations with cousins.

I encourage you to make the time, and attend a family reunion when the opportunity arrives. The associations, information and stories are priceless.

Good Hunting!

Read Full Post »

The Chillicothe Constitution Tribune (Chillicothe,Missouri) reported  – 14 Sep 1932 – on the SIXTH annual Smiley Family Reunion. The story reported 89 in attendance. On that date the reunion was in held at Lemon, Missouri.

On 15 Oct 2017 The Smiley Reunion will be held in Wheeling, Missouri, just east of Chillicothe. (It has been held in Wheeling for over 50 years now.)

This reunion is a gathering of descendants of John Andrew Smiley ( 1819-1895) and Nancy Ann Cornelius (1820-1905).

With modern technology, I have been able to connect to at least 14 relatives via DNA testing with Ancestry.com / ftdna.com / 23andme.com & myheritage.com.

However, the largest group by far, are my “Facebook Friends.”

I look forward to seeing relations I have known for some time, and meeting relatives I may only know through social media. The biggest treat will be the additional family stories I hope to hear and record.

It is the family stories, passed down from generation to generation, that draw us closer to our ancestors and each other.

John and Nancy had a family of 14 children. 12 children lived long enough to marry and have children of their own.

It will be interesting to see how many of the 12 children will be represented by their descendants.

October is Family History month.  Reach out to your relations, share stories of your ancestors and then pass these on to your family.

Have a great time

With modern technology, I have been able to connect to at least 14 relatives via DNA testing with Ancestry.com / ftdna.com / 23andme.com & myheritage.com.

However, the largest group by far, are my “Facebook Friends.”

I look forward to seeing relations I have known for some time, and meeting relatives I may only know through social media. The biggest treat will be the additional family stories I hope to hear and record.

It is the family stories, passed down from generation to generation, that draw us closer to our ancestors and each other.

John and Nancy had a family of 14 children. 12 children lived long enough to marry and have children of their own.

It will be interesting to see how many of the 12 children will be represented by their descendants.

October is Family History month.  Reach out to your relations, share stories of your ancestors and then pass these on to your family.

Good Hunting!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »