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The Lock-In is just over a week away! This is the seventh year we have participated in the Texas-Wide Lock-in. We’ve grown from 5 libraries to 29 libraries participating all across Texas. We are so excited about the event. The webinars will be from 11 am-9:30 pm. The Library will be open from 9 am-11 pm. This year we will have staff and volunteers available to help you with beginning genealogy, brick walls, using the large 17” x 28” scanner, and DNA research. We have a few genealogy and history groups attending so you can visit with them. No registration is required and supper is from 5-6 pm and on your own.

Here’s the line-up for the webinars:

11:00 – 11:50 am Orphan Train Riders: Tracks to Texas & Beyond, All Aboard 1854 to 1929

Paula Perkins

Texas was a vital part of this history. Research techniques and resources will be demonstrated.

Noon-1:30 pm Beginner’s Guide to Documenting Your Family History

LaToya Devezin, Community Archivist, Austin History Center

Learn a fresh approach and up-to-date information in this first-step Beginner’s class.

1:40 – 2:40 pm Discover Local History through a Regional Depository

Laura Saegert, Assistant Director for Archives, Archives & Information Services Division, TSLAC

The presentation will introduce you to the wonderful sources of information for your genealogical and historical work from The Regional Historical Resources Depository (RHRD) Program of the Texas State Library & Archives Commission.

2:50 – 3:50 pm My Texans during the Republic.

Sharon Farnsworth, Registrar for the Sterling C. Robertson Chapter of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas

Learn how to track your generations back to your Ancestors during the Republic of Texas through birth and death certificates, census, and wills.

4:00 – 5:00 pm Connecting Your DNA Matches

Diahan Southard, Your DNA Guide

There is much that can be accomplished by first identifying the connections between those on your match list, and then working together to determine how you are related. Learn the tips and tricks to this powerful method of match analysis.

5:00-6:00 pm Dinner Break

6:00 – 7:00 pm Researching Your Czech Immigrant Ancestor’s Background in the Old Fatherland

Dr. Miroslav Koudelka, Genealogy researcher and guide from the Czech Republic & TCGS charter member

This presentation will cover the strategies and sources (both online & in print) to trace your Moravian or Bohemian ancestry.

7:10 – 8:10 pm Get the Scoop on Your Ancestors with Newspapers

Lisa Louise Cooke, Family History Author, Speaker, & Producer, The Genealogy Gems Podcast

Learn the specialized approach and tech tools required to achieve success in locating newspapers, and uncovering the genealogical gems they contain about your family.

8:20 – 9:30 pm Discovering Your WWI Ancestor: Sources & Resources

Earl Pogue, Family Historian & Author

Discover what resources are available to identify and provide information about your ancestor that served in the Great War.

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The Chillicothe Constitution Tribune (Chillicothe,Missouri) reported  – 14 Sep 1932 – on the SIXTH annual Smiley Family Reunion. The story reported 89 in attendance. On that date the reunion was in held at Lemon, Missouri.

On 15 Oct 2017 The Smiley Reunion will be held in Wheeling, Missouri, just east of Chillicothe. (It has been held in Wheeling for over 50 years now.)

This reunion is a gathering of descendants of John Andrew Smiley ( 1819-1895) and Nancy Ann Cornelius (1820-1905).

With modern technology, I have been able to connect to at least 14 relatives via DNA testing with Ancestry.com / ftdna.com / 23andme.com & myheritage.com.

However, the largest group by far, are my “Facebook Friends.”

I look forward to seeing relations I have known for some time, and meeting relatives I may only know through social media. The biggest treat will be the additional family stories I hope to hear and record.

It is the family stories, passed down from generation to generation, that draw us closer to our ancestors and each other.

John and Nancy had a family of 14 children. 12 children lived long enough to marry and have children of their own.

It will be interesting to see how many of the 12 children will be represented by their descendants.

October is Family History month.  Reach out to your relations, share stories of your ancestors and then pass these on to your family.

Have a great time

With modern technology, I have been able to connect to at least 14 relatives via DNA testing with Ancestry.com / ftdna.com / 23andme.com & myheritage.com.

However, the largest group by far, are my “Facebook Friends.”

I look forward to seeing relations I have known for some time, and meeting relatives I may only know through social media. The biggest treat will be the additional family stories I hope to hear and record.

It is the family stories, passed down from generation to generation, that draw us closer to our ancestors and each other.

John and Nancy had a family of 14 children. 12 children lived long enough to marry and have children of their own.

It will be interesting to see how many of the 12 children will be represented by their descendants.

October is Family History month.  Reach out to your relations, share stories of your ancestors and then pass these on to your family.

Good Hunting!

DNA Interest Group

REMINDER – The FIRST WEDNESDAY of each month through December, we hold the DNA Interest Group at the Genealogy Center.  The group meets from 6:30 pm –  7:30 pm in the Genealogy Conference Room. (Located in the basement.)

The Genealogy Center is in the W.O. Haggard, Jr. Library

2501 Coit Road

Plano, Texas   75075

The event is open to everyone interested in DNA Genealogy.

Hope to see you there.

Our digital collection, Collin County Images, has a new look! It can be seen much easier on a tablet, computer, or iPhone. It is setup to search a little easier, also. The timelines, access to the Library homepage, and our genealogy blog connections are located at the top right corner where the Menu is located or at the bottom of the page.

It still has the same URL – https://glhtadigital.contentdm.oclc.org. Go have a look!

There are various reasons people take DNA tests. Some are seeking medical knowledge, some are adopted children looking to reunite with the birth parents, others are seeking information on their father’s line or their mother’s line. I was looking for cousins, hoping to find information on lines where I had little or no information.

AND THAT IS WHAT HAPPENED!!

I tested with four different companies. One of the results has been to connect with a cousin also researching the ancestry of David Huggans (1815-1897 ) and Elizabeth Riley (1822-1918 ) who are both buried in Cantril, Iowa.

Reviewing the information provided by this cousin, I found suggestions on Elizabeth’s paternal line that I was able to research.  I found documented marriage, probate and burial information that allowed me to add about six or seven generations to our RILEY line.  I found Charles  Riley, son of Charles Riley and Mary Mays, grandson of John Railey (Riley) and Elizabeth Randolph)

and William Mays and Catherine Swann.  Elizabeth Randolph is the daugher of Colonel Isham Randolph and Jane Rogers (Rodgers). Elizabeth’s sister, Jane married Peter Jefferson and had a son Thomas, writer of the Declaration of Independence and 3rd President of the United States.

Elizabeth Randolph’s grandparents, William Randolph and Mary Isham, are the 2nd Great-Grandparents of General Henry “Lighthorse Harry” Lee.

They were also the 2nd Great-Grandparents of Chief Justice of the Supreme Court John Marshall.

I had NO IDEA that connecting with DNA cousins could be a link to some very historical individuals.

I am able to connect my grandson, nieces and nephews to individuals involved in the creation of this country.  I hope that knowing their connections to these individuals, will spark an interest in their school studies and hopefully, as they grow, their genealogical research.

I invite you to come into the Genealogy Center and allow us to assist you in your research.  Perhaps, you too, will find Patriot Ancestors.

Good Hunting!

All events are free and located at the Haggard Library in the Genealogy Center

Classes:

Where in the World Are They?

How to locate your immigrant ancestors

Thursday           Sep 14 9:30-11am

 How to Join the DAR

Learn what it takes to become a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Get help researching your Revolutionary War ancestor

Saturday            Sep 23 10am

Genealogy 101

Learn how to start your family research and fill in your family tree

Thursday           Oct 5    9:30-11am

 Genealogy Databases: Part 1

Learn some strategies for searching Ancestry.com, as well as tricks to take home to use for your genealogy research

Wednesday       Oct 25  9:30-11am

Genealogy Databases: Part 2

Tips and tricks for searching FamilySearch and Fold3

Thursday           Oct 26  9:30-11am

Clues from Cemeteries

Learn the many ways to find the cemetery of your ancestor and the other family members hiding there

Wednesday       Nov 8   9:30-11am

 

Special Event:

Genealogy Lock-In

Spend the afternoon and evening researching at this 7th annual event featuring webinars, genealogy libraries from across Texas, one-on-one assistance, genealogy and history groups, and much more

Friday                 Oct 20  11am-11pm

 

Monthly Forums:

DNA Interest Group

Discuss and explore the use of DNA in genealogy research

Wednesdays     6:30-7:30pm

Sep 6 – Oct 4 – Nov 1 – Dec 6

Legacy Research

Join the Legacy Users Group for information sharing, research tips, webinars and one-on-one help

Tuesdays            1:30-5pm

Sep 26 – Oct 24 – Nov 28

DNA Genealogy seems to be the “latest and greatest” part of genealogy research these days.

I was somewhat reluctant to join the band-wagon.

However, in August 2014 Ancestry.com had a SALE on DNA kits, so I bit. I sent off and received my DNA test kit. I filled the tube with saliva, sent it off and waited for the results.

Unlike the TV commercials, I did not find my Scandinavian ancestors to actually be Scottish. What I did find was a list of POSSIBLE cousins.
Some had trees on Ancestry.com and some did not.

My curiosity was aroused. I attended different DNA classes at various Genealogy Society presentations.

I discovered Ancestry.com compared my DNA with THEIR database. But what about other cousins that didn’t test with Ancestry? Did they test with another company? If so, how could I compare my results with theirs?  I was not able to test with the other companies. The cost was too great.

Enter GEDmatch.com. This is a “cost-free” site that allows you to upload your DNA results from any of the four companies (Ancestry.com, ftDNA.com, MyHeritage.com & 23andme.com) so you can compare results.

So now I found that by taking one DNA test, I could compare with two “ponds” – Ancestry.com and GEDmatch.com.  The problem here is that not everyone that takes a DNA test uploads their results to GEDmatch.com.

If I wanted my DNA compared to the largest possible audience I would need to test with all four companies.

In 2015 the Family Finder the test for FamilyTree DNA (ftDNA.com) went on sale. Since my father was rapidly approaching 90 years in age, I bought a kit and had him test. The next year, again ftDNA.com had another sale to include Y-DNA tests, so I upgraded his DNA.  Now I had family DNA in three databases – Ancestry.com, GEDmatch.com and ftDNA.com. Recently I was able to upload my Ancestry.com results to ftDNA.com.

Within the last 18 months MyHeritage.com and 23andme.com both had sales on their respective DNA tests. I went ahead and tested with each company.

I now have family results in Ancestry.com, ftDNA.com, My Heritage.com and 23andme.com. In each case my results were compared ONLY with their own databases.  I had to upload my results, individually to GEDmatch.com.

Now that I have spent all that money, and have results with each company, what are the results?

COUSINS!! Previously unknown cousins that have been doing genealogy.

I have been able to share information with cousins, extend my family tree, add documentation and photos, help correct misinformation and most of all, communicate with extended family with a similar interest in family history.

From testing with all four of the companies, I now have scientific proof that my father and I are related!  Good to know.

I am attempting to identify of my paternal 5th G-Grandfather.  Sparse documentation has indicated he could be one of two different individuals. As I contact cousins, I hope to prove which of these individuals is my direct relation. I am compiling documentation and DNA results to try and “prove” which individual is to answer to my current “brick wall.”

Testing with all four companies (using SALE prices for their autosomal DNA test) still cost me from $240 to $320 spread over three years. The Y-DNA test was on sale for $129.00. For me, that cash spent was worth it. I gained additional resources, information and personal satisfaction.

Perhaps, a DNA test will allow you the contacts and/or information to assist in your ancestral search.

If you are considering testing, Please take the time and compare what each company offers and the respective financial cost. Each company has it’s own advantages and drawbacks. Examine each company, the test(s) they offer and what results they may provide. Select the one(s) you want and can afford so that you get your money’s worth and hopefully obtain the results you are seeking.

Good Hunting!

**** Starting in September 2017, the Genealogy Center will host a DNA Interest Group the first Wednesday of each month at 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the W.O. Haggard, Jr. Library.  Those interested in DNA genealogy are invited to attend.