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The Genealogy Center at the Haggard Library is hosting a display by the John Cavet Chapter of the U. S. Daughters of 1812. The items will be on display for the month of August. Come to the lower level of the Haggard Library to see it.

A big thank you to a wonderful job done by Carol Tatum, Teena Humphris, Ora Jane Johnson, and Dorcas Helms!

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The maintenance that had be scheduled for July 29th has been postponed.

Ancestry.com (and all other databases here in the library) should be available and working Saturday, July 29th and Sunday July 30th.

Come in and visit the Genealogy Center.  You may find that “lost” ancestor.

Good Hunting!

The Genealogy Center received a message from Proquest:

“On Saturday, 29 July 2017, a ProQuest product maintenance window will launch worldwide to upgrade infrastructure, enhance security, and maintain reliability of your products. During this 9-hour window, some ProQuest products will be unavailable.”

It will be unavailable from 2pm-11pm on July 29th.

Don’t worry it will be back on Sunday, July 30th.

From the Texas State Historical Association:

“On this day in 1917, the United States War Department issued orders mobilizing the Thirty-sixth Infantry Division (known as the “Texas Division” or the “T-Patchers”) at Camp Bowie in Tarrant County.The division, initially composed mostly of Texas National Guard troops, fought in World War I and again in World War II. During the latter conflict, one unit of the division, which became known as the “lost battalion,” was captured at the fall of Java. The men of the battalion spent the war in Japanese prison camps, and many died building the Burma Railroad. When the War Department made national guard units available to the governors of the states in 1946, the Thirty-sixth Division was reactivated. The Thirty-sixth was called to active duty during the Cuban Missile Crisis, but was eliminated by January 1968. In 1946 veterans of the unit founded the Thirty-sixth Division Association.”

On a more LOCAL note – PFC Seymour Todd – Anna, Texas – served in the Texas Division in World War II. He was seriously wounded on 24 January 1944 during the “Battle of the Bloody River” in Italy. He was one of about 20 North Texans killed or wounded during this battle.  Seymour Todd survived the war, returned to Collin County and married Matilie Harper in 1945. Seymour Todd died 8 Dec 1978 in Jacksonville, Texas and is buried in Resthaven Memorial Park of the same city.

Come in and visit the Genealogy Center.  Let us assist you in finding your heroes.

Good Hunting!

I have been trying to determine if Martin Fugate is my  5th Great Grandfather. I had my father take a Y-DNA test. When I received the results I was excited to match a previously unknown cousin. We have traded emails.

I am fairly certain Martin died in Russell County, Virginia prior to 1803. I am not certain where he was born.

My cousin sent me some information on Martin. His information states Martin was born about 1725 in Russell County, Virginia. He died about 1802 in Russell County, Virginia.

At first glance this is Wonderful.

However, a closer look finds that Russell County, Virginia was created on 17 Oct 1785 from Washington County, Virginia.

Oops! Martin was NOT born in Russell County, Virginia. Where could he have been born?

Tracing the area back to 1725, I found the following:
Washington County was created 7 Oct 1776 from Fincastle County.
Fincastle County was created in 1772 from Botetourt County.
Botetourt County was created 7 Nov 1769 from Augusta County.
Augusta County was created 1 Aug 1738 from Orange County.
Orange County was created 1 Feb 1734 from Spotsylvania County.
Spotsylvania County was created 2 Nov 1720.

It is possible that Martin was born in Spotsylvania County, Virginia about 1725.

However, family records indicate (not prove) that Martin’s father was Josiah Fugate. If this is correct another problem arises.

Josiah’s will was filed in King George County, Virginia. King George County and Spotsylvania County were both created on 2 Nov 1720. They are adjacent to each other.

From my current information, my next searches will be in both King George and Spotsylvania Counties.

The lesson here is Be Aware of WHEN a particular county was created.

Looking for records in Russell County, Virginia in 1725 would be a waste of time, as it was not created for another 60 years. Just knowing that Russell County was created from Washington County is not good enough either.

Take the time to know the county and state creation dates. It makes your search less frustrating.

Look at all of the information available and be careful NOT to take undocumented information as Proof.

Good Hunting!

US Census Records – Learn how to search the US Census, 1790-1940, to find information about your ancestor

Haggard Wed Jun 21 9:30-11am

How to Join the DAR – Learn what it takes to become a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Get help researching your Revolutionary War ancestor

Haggard Sat Jun 24 10am-1pm

 

Brick Walls – Bring your “brick wall” & let us help you break it down

Haggard Wed Jul 19 9:30am-12pm

DNA for Beginners – Learn the basics of using DNA testing to help with genealogy research

Haggard Thu Aug 24 9:30-11am

Legacy Research –  Join the Legacy Users Group for information sharing, research tips, webinars and one-on-one help

Haggard Tuesdays 1:30-5pm Jun 27 ● Jul 25 ● Aug 22

Genealogy Graphic_Webinar Wednesday_HR

The Genealogy Center is hosting webinars on the first Wednesday of each month this summer.

June 7, 1-2pm – US Church Records – Learn how to research US church records to find information about your ancestors.

July 5, 1-3:30pm – British Resources – Learn about British records & how to access them on Ancestry & FamilySearch.

August 2, 1-3:30pm – Irish Church Records – Find out what you can learn through Catholic & Protestant church records on FamilySearch.